2015/08/27
Vol.4, No.2 Sumanto

Contents>> Vol. 4, No. 2 Christianity and Militancy in Eastern Indonesia: Revisiting the Maluku Violence Sumanto Al Qurtuby* * Department of General Studies, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran, 31261, Saudi Arabia e-mail: squrtuby[at]gmail.com During the Maluku interreligious violence from 1999 to 2002, both Islam and Christianity contributed to the initiation and intensification of the collective conflict. This article examines the role of religion, especially Christianity, and discusses how Christian identities, teachings, doctrines, symbols, discourses, organizations, and networks became some of the contributing factors in the early phases of the Maluku mayhem. It also examines the complex roles played by Moluccan Christian actors, especially the religious militias, in […]

2014/02/24
Vol. 1, No. 3, Tatsuki KATAOKA

Contents>> Vol. 1, No. 3 Tai Buddhist Practices in Dehong Prefecture, Yunnan, China Religion as Non-religion: The Place of Chinese Temples in Phuket, Southern Thailand Tatsuki Kataoka* * 片岡 樹, Graduate School of Asian and African Area Studies, Kyoto University, 46 Shimoadachi- cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan e-mail: kataoka[at]asafas.kyoto-u.ac.jp This paper, based on a case study of Chinese temples in Phuket, aims to demonstrate the importance of religious activities lying outside “religion” in the so-called “Buddhist” societies in Thailand, as well as to question the category of “religion” itself. In Thailand, most of the Chinese temples (called sanchao in Thai) are not recognized as “religious places” by the religious administration […]

 

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